chilled broccoli soup with zucchini, caraway seed, basil, and lemon


While I had my morning coffee, I opened my house to cool with the morning breeze and quickly made this soup, chilling now for a refreshing dinner and lunch tomorrow during this heat wave! It was my first attempt at a vegan chilled broccoli soup, and I think it’s going to be very tasty, even better after the flavors have melded while chilling today. This made enough for 6 good sized bowls, next time I’ll try doubling the recipe and freezing some.

ingredients:

  • 1 medium head broccoli, chopped
  • 1 cup or so of zucchini, chopped
  • 1 medium red potato, chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 1 carrot, chopped or grated
  • 1 medium leek, chopped
  • 1 t caraway seed
  • 1/2 t black mustard seeds
  • 1 t fresh ginger root, diced
  • 4 medium fresh basil leaves, diced
  • 1/4 t salt, black pepper to taste
  • 1/2 large lemon, juice and pulp
  • 5 c water

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instructions:

Pare away any tough outer skin from broccoli stalks, then chop stalks and flowerets. Chop and dice all other ingredients. I happened to have some left over fresh zucchini, so I added that too, and I think looking back it was a good addition for both taste and texture. Saute leek and red potato in 2 T olive oil for 2 minutes, then add caraway seed and ginger root, continue to stir for 3-4 minutes until potato just begins to almost brown. Add chopped celery, carrot, zucchini, basil, and broccoli stalks and flowerets along with 1/4 t salt and 5 cups of fresh water brought first almost – but not to- a boil. Reduce heat and simmer covered to retain nutrients until potatoes, carrots, and broccoli stems are soft, about 5 minutes. Add juice and pulp of 1/2 lemon and black pepper. After taste testing, I added another 1/4 t salt, for health given that it is so hot now, and to complement the taste of all these veggies when served chilled. Remove from heat and cool — not wanting to add any unnecessary heat to my kitchen, I literally took my hot soup pot and placed it outside on a hot pad on my wooden deck bench to cool for a bit. Once cooled some, blend in batches until smooth.

This soup has a nice texture and fragrance. Refrigerate and serve chilled. I may try this garnished with a dollop of organic Euoropean style plain yogurt, for flavor and some protein, or garnish with roasted pumpkin seeds.  I may serve it with a small dish of chilled blueberries and walnuts? Yum, light and also satisfying.

green pea soup with turnip & leek, mint and lemon thyme


This record setting long and wet Spring dovetailed with my lovely vacation in Paris and Tuscany, which means my vegetable starts were germinated and transplanted late. My garden is now boldly trying to catch up and/or make it through these periodic brief mid- to upper-80F days that are brutal for the earlier season vegetable varieties. I gambled and planted sweet peas late, will simply have to wait and see how the season comes on and if they can thrive…

I spotted plump fresh organic green peas at the market only a few hours after I had assessed my garden; I couldn’t resist picking those up, and rounded out my purchase with a leek, turnip, and large red potato. It was a cool and wet day, and I was thinking soup– Yes, I adore soup, warming and nurturing when it’s cold out, cooling and refreshing on stellar hot days. Reflecting, I realized I’d never made a fresh pea soup, only dried split pea soup! Here was my opportunity… I liked what I created; my partner’s first thought with a taster spoon from the pot was “Good! but perhaps less mint next time?” But when I served dinner, his bowl was quickly emptied. I especially liked mine drizzled with a little European style plain tart yogurt. I expected this would be great served cold on a warm day too, and that this batch along with the current weather forecast would allow me to test both warm and chilled serving options. Sure enough, when I tried it served chilled, I thought it was delicious.

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ingredients:

  • 3 cups fresh peas
  • 1 leek, chopped
  • 1 turnip, chopped
  • 1 large red potato, chopped
  • 4-5 cups fresh water
  • 12 medium leaves fresh mint, diced
  • 3 large sprigs fresh lemon thyme leaves
  • 1/2 large lemon
  • 1/8 t sea salt
  • fresh ground black pepper to taste
  • European style plain tart yogurt

instructions:

Cover peas with 4 cups water, bring to boil, then reduce heat and simmer covered for 2-3 minutes, just until peas are bright and becoming soft. Set aside. Meanwhile, using large soup pot, saute chopped leek, turnip, and red potato in 2T butter and a drizzle of olive oil, until leek is translucent and potatoes are beginning to brown, about 3 minutes. Add several tablespoons or so of white wine, cover and reduce heat; steam about 3 minutes, until red potatoes and turnip have softened, but are not mushy. Then combine cooked peas and all of their liquid into the soup pot, mix all together well, and allow to cool. (This is an important nutrient step: When you cook vegetables in water, much of the vitamins are lost into the water. Thus you want to retain the steam by covering while cooking, and use the cooking water in the recipe.) Once cooled some for safe blending, puree in blender in small batches, and return to soup pot. Assess thickness, and adjust as necessary with additional water just off boil. Add the juice of the lemon, sea salt, and fresh ground pepper. I wanted my soup fairly thick yet smooth. You may like yours not quite as thick and with a cup or so of fresh cooked peas added after you’ve pureed? If so, cook more peas and set some aside. I served this drizzled with a little European style plain tart yogurt and fresh thyme leaves, together with a mixed green salad with walnuts, currants, and daikon radish, and white wine.

 

 

turnip, parsnip, red potato soup with roasted pumpkin seeds


The season is changing– I feel it when I tuck into bed at night, and when I watch sunrise these mornings. “Seasons changing I can smell it in the air I can see it in their paintings And I can hear it in the wind, hear it rise and descend Through the many colored trees, forms a many colored breeze Made of many colored leaves, departing ever so gracefully” (Elephant Revival, Ring Around the Moon)…  The Autumnal Equinox is next week, reminding me of work to be done timely, and of the need for balance. My thoughts turn to experimenting making chutney with a friend’s fresh figs (more on that in another post) and to making soup… for an Equinox Party! Thus this experiment with a new fall root soup that fits into a darkness and light/black and white color palette. Yum.

ingredients

  • 4 medium turnips, peeled and chopped
  • 1 medium-large parship, peeled and chopped
  • 1 medium-large red potato, peeled and chopped
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped
  • 1-2t dried rosemary
  • 1/4t salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste
  • 2-3 sprigs of fresh lemon thyme from my garden (or 1/2t or so dried)
  • 1/2 cube Celfibr brand vegetable bouillon dissolved in 1c hot water
  • 3-4 additional c water
  • 1/2-1 c milk if desire creaminess

instructions:

Saute onion in large soup pot in 1-2T butter or olive oil for 2 min or so, then add red potato and saute for another 3-4 minutes before adding peeled and chopped turnips and parsnip, rosemary and lemon thyme. Stir well, then add 1c vegetable bouillon broth and 2c fresh water, cover and simmer until vegetables are soft, about 10 minutes. Check for full softness, then remove from heat, add salt and black pepper. Allow to cool enough to then puree in blender. Adjust consistency with milk unless you’re serving this vegan so use fresh water or additional fresh vegetable broth if you happen to have some on hand. Garnish with roasted pumpkin seeds. Yum!